Asante Mwalimu

World Teachers’ Day is on 5th October each year. I’m, like most other people, caught up with the business and busyness of my present life that I hardly give a thought to my past, or to the teachers that shaped who I am today.

Image courtesy http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/

Image courtesy http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/

There have been many teachers in my life. In the primary school where I sat for my KCPE, there was a mathematics teacher who showed me I didn’t have to settle for 90%, with attention to details I could and often did get 100%. There was a dedicated retired teacher who was on contract teaching us Swahili and I owe my current level of fluency to him. There was the Geography teacher who wasn’t tolerating any signs of truancy from us.. However, it would be hard to trace all these teachers today given my former school is physically no more! It was a private boarding school, getting perhaps rundown by mismanagement, and I hear it is now a seminary.

Now onto high school. It has been a decade since I last walked out of Loreto High School, Limuru. I haven’t been back in as long because I feel my business there was quite done when I picked my KCSE and leaving certificates. I have many memories of that place. Who doesn’t? There were good teachers, there were so-so teachers, and there were some great teachers.

One of my most memorable and influential teachers, although he probably doesn’t realize it, is one Mr. Obuong. Everything else aside, he was a great biology and chemistry teacher. I owe the As I got in those subjects to him. To this day, I can remember some of the essays we had to write in the biology exams word for word; and the experiments we carried out in the biology lab on weekends are stuck in my head. He was one dedicated teacher with clear, unambiguous notes that he sometimes had those students with good handwriting make copies for his well-organized files. Everyone in class had to have a separate biology file and although we weren’t the easiest class to teach (4B class of 2005!), we all complied with rules.

When it comes to Chemistry, I can’t even remember quite clearly who our teacher was. I think it was Mrs R. But I knew I was going to fail the subject if I didn’t do something; I wasn’t grasping the mole concept and those chemistry calculations, organic chemistry and what not.. so I joined Mr. Obuong’s tuition class. Because he was organized, and explained the concepts clearly, then everything fell into place and I finally loved and understood chemistry.

Now that I have been forced down memory lane, we were to pay for those extra tuition classes (considering he wasn’t our Chemistry teacher). To this day I don’t even remember how much but I know I owe him a debt bigger than any few thousand shillings (I shall make this right the next time I am back in the country).

For now, I would like to say, thank you. Thank you to all the teachers who’ve taught me over the years, and especially, thanks to Mr. Obuong for being a great teacher.

By the way, Jacaranda Africa will be giving out the magazines to schools around the country in their effort to say thank you to their teachers.

  • My math’s teachers were always the best. Mr. Kariri in primary school and Miss. Were in high school.

    • savvykenya

      Good teachers make learning so much fun!